Omnifocus

Reading time:
1 min. | 193 words

Gabe Weatherhead points to Sean Korzdorfer’s great outline on how he uses OmniFocus and notes. I was particularly interested in his time-based contexts:

Morning – A bucket for tasks best done first thing in the morning. Usually coding or technical writing. Start Time: 06:00.

Afternoon – A bucket for tasks best done when I’m starting to get tired, burnt out or stupid. Usually research and administrative tasks. Start Time: 13:00.

Evening – A bucket for family or personal project tasks that I can complete while half asleep. Start Time: 17:00.

My OmniFocus contexts take on a Merlin Mann level of granularity, and I’ve also been heavily inspired by Kourosh Dini’s advice in Creating Flow with OmniFocus. Here’s just a snippet of my contexts:

OmniFocus contexts

But I’m particularly interested in the idea because I operate in a similar way: depending on the time of day I’m better suited for certain tasks. At one point in my pre-OmniFocus days I was using a similar system with contexts that were based on energy levels (e.g., “dashes,” “brain dead,” “focus,” and so on). Korzdorfer’s contexts worth considering the next moment I take the time to revisit my tasks.


About

Greetings! My name is Jason Heppler. I am a Digital Engagement Librarian and Assistant Professor of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a scholar of the twentieth-century United States. I often write here about the history of the North American West, technology, the environment, politics, culture, and coffee. You can follow me on Twitter, or learn more about me.

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