Classes, Seminars, and Workshops

2018

  • AHA Digital History Workshop: Network Analysis

    This seminar will emphasize the hands-on learning of working with network data, with special attention paid to its application to research and the classroom. Syllabus

  • Introduction to Digital History

    This course confronts the current and potential influence of digital media on the theory and practice of history. We will focus on resources enabling new forms of scholarship, looking at tools for visualization and text analysis for generating historical interpretations, and explore alternative forms of publishing, design, and research. The course covers a range of readings along with a critical engagement with tools and resources. Students will also contribute to a digital spatial exhibit on the history of Omaha.

2017

  • Workshop: What is Endangered Data

    During this three hour workshop, we will explore the ways that Github can be used for creating websites, storing data, and working with collaborators. We will explore the basics of git and Github, use some of Github’s essential features, and talk about repo best practices. Participants will need to bring their own laptops; access to a *nix environment is preferred but not required.

  • Workshop: Data Manipulation with R

    This hour-and-a-half hands-on workshop will introduce the basics of tidying data in R. Rather than run the risk of research questions being wedged into a tool rather than the tool fitting the research, we will look at the ways the R language can be used to clean and tidy data for analysis. The workshop will introduce participants to the basics of data manipulation, the dplyr and tidyr packages, and the grammar of data manipulation.

  • Workshop: Web Scraping with R

    We often want data in a tidy format. While this often makes for a convenient and human-readable framework, data doesn’t always come nicely formatted especially from the web. This hour-long workshop will provide a quick overview of popular methods for acquiring information/data from the web using R, with a focus on harvesting government data. No prerequisite software is required; a version of RStudio will be provided to participants via a server.

  • Workshop: What is Endangered Data?

    What is endangered data and how do we identify it? What are the risks of this data disappearing or being curtailed? Come to this workshop to learn more about endangered, missing, or uncollected data and ways you can help contribute to protecting and preserving data.

  • Workshop: Network Analysis

    This seminar will emphasize the hands-on learning of working with network data, with special attention paid to its application to research and the classroom. Syllabus

  • AHA Digital History Workshop: Network Analysis

    This seminar will emphasize the hands-on learning of working with network data, with special attention paid to its application to research and the classroom. Syllabus

2016

  • Digital Public History

    This is a hands-on course that introduces students to the intersections of digital history and public history to serve the needs of academic and non-academic audiences. Digital environments such as social media, blogs, exhibits, digital collections and archives, and mobile applications are changing the ways historians interact with their publics. This course introduces theories and methods of digital history and public history, including designing digital exhibits, describing and publishing digital collections, mobile computing, shared authority, and methods for evaluating public history.

  • Digital Humanities in the Classroom

    This seminar will emphasize the hands-on learning of working with geospatial and network data, with special attention paid to its application to the classroom. The workshop seeks to prep teachers to instruct their students in various approaches to digital humanities in their classes. Syllabus

  • R, Interactive Graphics, and Data Visualization for the Humanities

    The visualization of historical and literary data has become a common practice in digital humanities, drawing on older traditions of visualizing in these disciplines. A variety of out-of-the-box tools exist for easily jumping in to data and information visualization, but when we use these tools we run the risk of research questions being wedged into a tool rather than the tool fitting the research. This course introduces students to humanities visualizations, using a programming language that let researchers prioritize their questions over the requirements of ready-made tools.

2015

  • Teaching Digital History

    In this workshop, we will discuss ways to integrate digital methods into history classrooms. These new approaches aid students, teachers, and professors in working with primary sources, crafting original arguments, and presenting historical work in a public venue. Syllabus

2014

  • Digital History: Sources, Methods, Problems

    This is a hands-on course that introduces students to the use of digital tools and sources to conduct original historical research, analyze and interpret findings, and communicate results. Digital history is an interdisciplinary approach that seeks to bring digital technology into conversation with humanities disciplines and, specifically, seeks to analyze, synthesize, and present knowledge through computational media. Digital historians create digital archival collections, databases, digitize objects, analyze humanistic material in digital form, and addresses scholarly questions often difficult, if not impossible, to ask using non-computational methods.

  • Doing Digital History

    This workshop series addresses a variety of digital methods for historians, including working with Zotero, Paper Machines, spatial humanities, databases, text analysis, topic modeling, and research management tools. The workshop allows faculty and graduate students to get hands-on with a variety of tools, including MALLET, Neatline, Omeka, Google Earth/Maps, DEVONThink, Zotero, and Paper Machines.

2012

  • Programming in the Humanities

    Over the course of my training as a digital historian, I have had two opportunities where classroom instruction involved learning a programming language. The first was in Prof. Stephen Ramsay’s Electronic Text course during the fall of 2010 where I formally learned Ruby. The other was this past fall in a digital humanities seminar with Prof. William Thomas where I self-taught myself Objective-C in a month to build an iOS application.

Some of the classes and workshops I have offered in recent years, including pointers to upcoming courses and other resources when available.


About

Greetings! My name is Jason Heppler. I am a Digital Engagement Librarian and Assistant Professor of History at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a scholar of the twentieth-century United States. I often write here about the history of the North American West, technology, the environment, politics, culture, and coffee. You can follow me on Twitter, or learn more about me.

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