Graduate students will participate in the same readings as undergraduates, but we will spend additional time on theoretical and practical issues in digital history. It intends to develop expertise in theories and tools while also promoting a collaborative learning process. We will find a time to meet outside of class that works well for all of us.

Assignments

Rather than contribute to Curatescape, I want you to make progress on your own research.

  • mock NEH ODH grant proposal

Readings

Week 1: What is Digital History?

September 29

  1. Prior to class, sign up for a domain name and hosting space with Reclaim Hosting.
  2. Install and customize WordPress

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Please complete the pre-class survey by the end of the week (September 30)
  • Where is your blog? (September 30)
  • Sept. 27: Write an introductory post on your blog about who you are, what you study, and what you hope to get out of the class
  • Sept. 27: Reading response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 2: What is Public History?

October 6

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Oct. 4: Reading response blog post
  • Oct. 8 by midnight: Sign up for discussion leader spots. These start next week, so you’ll need to be signed up before the end of the weekend.

Week 3: Collections and Archives

October 13

We will be meeting at Green Library to visit the university archives and meet archivists Daniel Hartwig and Leslie Berlin.

Readings:

  • Abby Smith, “Why Digitize?” (Council on Library and Information Resources, 1999)
  • Carole L. Palmer, “Thematic Research Collections,” chapter 24 in A Companion to Digital Humanities (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publications, 2004), pp. 348–365.

Assignments:

  • Oct. 14 by midnight: On your blog, a one paragraph project pitch for your digital public history project
  • Oct. 11: Reading response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 4: Project Management

October 20

No class. Instructor away at a conference.

Readings:

Nothing additional.

Assignments:

Anything you want me to know?

Week 5: Narrative and Interpretation

October 27

Readings:

  • Marie-Laure Ryan, “Will New Media Produce New Narratives?” chapter 12 in Marie-Laure Ryan, ed., Narrative Across Media: The Languages of Storytelling (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2004), 337–359.
  • Stephen Robertson, “Doing History in Hypertext,” Journal of the Association for History and Computing vol. 7 no. 2 (2004).
  • George Cotkin, “‘Hyping the Text’: Hypertext, Postmodernism, and the Historian,” American Studies vol. 37 no. 2 (1996): 103–116.
  • William G. Thomas III and Edward Ayers, “The Differences Slavery Made

Assignments:

  • Oct. 25: Reading response blog

Anything you want me to know?

Week 6: Visualization | Text Mining | Mapping

November 3

Readings:

  • Cameron Blevins, “Space, Nation, and the Triumph of Region: A View of the World from Houston,” Journal of American History (2014)
  • John Theibault, “[Visualization and Historical Arguments]”
  • Johanna Drucker, “[Humanities Approaches to the Graphic Display]”

Assignments:

  • Begin building the infrastructure of your public history exhibit:
    • Explore the Curatescape Stories feature and begin creating an Item for your exhibit, complete with primary sources and some rough draft text (November 4 by midnight).
  • Nov. 1: Reading / website response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 7: Community and Oral History

November 10

Readings:

Nothing additional.

Assignments:

  • Nov. 8: Reading / website response blog post
  • Nov. 10: Project progress update blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 8: Mobile

November 17

Readings:

Nothing additional.

Assignments:

  • Nov. 15: Reading / website response blog post
  • During class, you’ll give a 2–4 minute presentation on your research and aims of your exhibit (the progress blog post from last week should serve as the outline for your presentation.)
  • Sign up for a 15-20 minute meeting with the instructor to check in on progress. This can happen anytime this week or next (but must be by November 22). If no spots are available that work for your schedule, we will make different arrangements.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 9: Drafts

November 24

No class, Thanksgiving Break. Work on projects.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 10: Evaluation

December 1

Readings:

Assignments:

  • During class, you’ll present a 3–5 minute presentation on your research and final exhibit. This is also a chance to receive some early feedback from your peers and provide you some time to make edits and changes before the public presentation next week.
  • Dec. 2 by midnight: Draft an evaluation plan for your project on your blog. Draw on the readings to support your plan.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 11: Project Presentations

December 8

Assignments:

Project presentations, Lathrop Library, 1:30-3:00pm. Refreshments will be provided.

Final materials are due to me by midnight, December 9. Please submit your final URL to your exhibit, and write your final reflection blog post on the process of creating your project.