Since we’re spending three hours together once a week, I’ve set up the schedule into “halves” for each class. We’ll meet for roughly an hour and a half, take a fifteen minute break, and reconvene for the remainder of the class. The first half of the class will either revolve around a guest, lecture, or reading discussion. The second half may vary with reading discussion, tool discussion, or getting hands-on with a tool.

Note that readings are due on the date under which they are listed. For example, on September 29 we are discussing public history, so you should spend the week prior completing the readings, assignments, and prior-to-class exercises.

Week 1: What is Digital History?

September 29

  1. Prior to class, sign up for a domain name and hosting space with Reclaim Hosting.
  2. Install and customize WordPress

Readings:

For reference, read these at your leisure (not required for class, but may be helpful in managing the course reading load):

Assignments:

  • Please complete the pre-class survey by the end of the week (September 30)
  • Where is your blog? (September 30)
  • Sept. 27: Write an introductory post on your blog about who you are, what you study, and what you hope to get out of the class
  • Sept. 27: Reading response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 2: What is Public History?

October 6

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Oct. 4: Reading response blog post
  • Oct. 8 by midnight: Sign up for discussion leader spots. These start next week, so you’ll need to be signed up before the end of the weekend.

Week 3: Collections and Archives

October 13

We will be meeting at Green Library to visit the university archives and meet archivists Daniel Hartwig and Leslie Berlin.

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Oct. 14 by midnight: On your blog, a one paragraph project pitch for your digital public history project
  • Oct. 11: Reading response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 4: Project Management

October 20

No class. Instructor away at a conference.

Readings:

Assignments:

Anything you want me to know?

Week 5: Narrative and Interpretation

October 27

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Oct. 25: Reading response blog

Anything you want me to know?

Week 6: Visualization | Text Mining | Mapping

November 3

Readings:

  • John Theibault, “Visualizations and Historical Arguments,” in Writing History in the Digital Age, edited by Kristen Nawrotzki and Jack Dougherty (University of Michigan Press, 2013).
  • Ted Underwood, “Where to Start with Text Mining,” The Stone and the Shell, August 14, 2012.
  • Dan Cohen, “Searching for the Victorians,” October 4, 2010.
  • Richard White, “What is Spatial History?”
  • Stephen Robertson, “Putting Harlem on the Map,” Writing History in the Digital Age, edited by Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki (2012).

Assignments:

  • Begin building the infrastructure of your public history exhibit:
    • Explore the Curatescape Stories feature and begin creating an Item for your exhibit, complete with primary sources and some rough draft text (November 4 by midnight).
  • Nov. 1: Reading / website response blog post

Anything you want me to know?

Week 7: Community and Oral History

November 10

Readings:

Assignments:

Anything you want me to know?

Week 8: Mobile

November 17

Readings:

Assignments:

  • Explore sites:
  • Nov. 15: Reading / website response blog post
  • During class, you’ll give a 2–4 minute presentation on your research and aims of your exhibit (the progress blog post from last week should serve as the outline for your presentation.)
  • Sign up for a 15-20 minute meeting with the instructor to check in on progress. This can happen anytime this week or next (but must be by November 22). If no spots are available that work for your schedule, we will make different arrangements.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 9: Drafts

November 24

No class, Thanksgiving Break. Work on projects.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 10: Evaluation

December 1

Readings:

Assignments:

  • During class, you’ll present a 3–5 minute presentation on your research and final exhibit. This is also a chance to receive some early feedback from your peers and provide you some time to make edits and changes before the public presentation next week.
  • Dec. 2 by midnight: Draft an evaluation plan for your project on your blog. Draw on the readings to support your plan.

Anything you want me to know?

Week 11: Project Presentations

December 8

Readings:

Assignments:

Project presentations, Lathrop Library, 1:30-3:00pm. Refreshments will be provided.

Final materials are due to me by midnight, December 9. Please submit your final URL to your exhibit, and write your final reflection blog post on the process of creating your project.